Doctor of Nursing Practice Salary in Alabama

The number of RNs and APNs in Alabama with a doctoral degree in nursing increased dramatically between 2012 and 2014 according to the Alabama Health Coalition—an organization comprised of healthcare leaders like the Alabama Hospital Association, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama, and the Alabama Nurse Leaders in Education and Practice. Their latest report on the demographics of the state’s nurses showed a 37.5% increase in doctoral-prepared nurses over this two-year period.

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Most of Alabama’s nursing doctoral students are opting for a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) over a Ph.D. according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). Their data for 2015 indicated that the number of DNP students exceeded those seeking a Ph.D. by 37-fold.

DNP-educated nurses help to ameliorate the critical shortage of primary care providers in Alabama. For example, Coosa County had only 2.6 primary care doctors and one NP for every 10,000 residents in 2007, according to the Arise Citizens’ Policy Project.

Obtaining a DNP provides a significant economic benefit, helping to offer the assurance of higher salaries. The Advance Healthcare Network surveyed nurse practitioners throughout the US in 2014 and determined that NPs with a Doctor of Nursing Practice earned 13% more than NPs with a master’s degree.

Statewide Salary Data for DNP-Educated APNs and More in Alabama

DNP-educated nurses in all their various roles are consistently recognized for earning top salaries (Alabama Department of Labor, 2014):

Nurse Anesthetists:

  • Annual – $169,369
  • Hourly – Equal to or greater than $70

Nurse Administrators and Executives:

  • Annual – $112,474
  • Hourly – $54.07

Nurse Practitioners:

  • Annual – $105,820
  • Hourly – $50.87

Nurse-Midwives:

  • Annual – $82,837
  • Hourly – $39.82

Nurse Educators:

  • Annual – $75,194

Shown here are the averages for salaries that fall within the 75th percentile for each role. This best represents the average earnings for DNP-educated nurses, giving consideration to the fact that DNPs earn more than master’s-prepared nurses in the same roles.

Salaries for DNP Nurses in Alabama’s Largest Cities

The Alabama Department of Labor provides salary information for DNP-educated advanced nursing professionals in the state’s most populated cities (2014):

Nurse Anesthetists:

  • Birmingham-Hoover: $177,357
  • Huntsville: $175,748
  • Mobile: $175,144
  • Montgomery: $147,058

Nurse Administrators and Executives:

  • Birmingham-Hoover: $121,992
  • Montgomery: $121,279
  • Mobile: $116,456
  • Huntsville: $115,051

Nurse Practitioners:

  • Montgomery: $112,906
  • Birmingham-Hoover: $111,359
  • Huntsville: $198,787
  • Mobile: $83,898

Nurse Educators:

  • Mobile: $66,203

Shown here are the averages for salaries that fall within the 75th percentile for each role. This best represents the average earnings for DNP-educated nurses, giving consideration to the fact that DNPs earn more than master’s-prepared nurses in the same roles.

An Overview of Salaries for Alabama’s DNP-Educated Nurses as Published by the US Department of Labor

The US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics provides an overview of the salaries for Alabama’s nurses earning within the 75th and 90th percentiles to best represent earnings for DNP nurses (2014):

 

Occupation
Hourly 75th percentile wage
Annual 75th percentile wage
Medical and Health Services Managers
53.63
111540
Nursing Instructors and Teachers Postsecondary
Not available
74110
Nurse Anesthetists
79.30
164940
Nurse Practitioners
50.50
105040
Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners All Other
28.77
59840

*These values are equal to or greater than $90 an hour and $187199 per year. The US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics does not report salary data higher than these values.

This page includes salaries that fall within the 75th and 90th percentiles for each nursing role to account for the fact that DNP-educated nurses are recognized as earning more than master’s-prepared nurses in the same roles.

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