Doctor of Nursing Practice Salary in Connecticut

Connecticut strongly emphasized the education of nursing students following a 2008 report by the Connecticut League for Nursing that described the state’s “nursing shortage crisis.” At that time, projections indicated that the state would be short 34% of its required nurses by 2010, and Connecticut produced 39% fewer nurses on a per capita basis than the country’s average.

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Despite this emphasis, the state remains short of nurses according to a Connecticut Department of Labor survey from 2015. This survey identified nearly 1,700 open jobs for RNs in Connecticut.

Highly educated nurses such as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have the potential to help ameliorate the shortage of highly trained healthcare providers that faces Connecticut and the country according to an op-ed in the Hartford Courant by Drs. Regina Cusson and Ivy Alexander. They stated that more than 3,000 APRNs practiced in Connecticut as of 2014.

With a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) rapidly becoming the preferred degree, many current and prospective APRNs are seeking this high-level practice-focused credential. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported that 517 Connecticut students enrolled in DNP programs in the state as of 2015.

More than 7 times as many students sought DNPs as PhDs that year, reinforcing the value of the practice-based doctorate. The expertise of DNP-educated nurses helps provide an assurance of high salaries.

Statewide Salary Data for DNP-Educated APRNs and More in Connecticut

Nurse administrators in Connecticut earned the 4th highest average salary in the country in 2014 according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. DNP-educated nurses in all their various roles are consistently recognized for earning top salaries (Connecticut Department of Labor, 2015):

  • Nurse Administrators and Executives – $187,199*
  • Nurse Anesthetists – $187,199*
  • Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners – $171,503
  • Nurse Practitioners – $126,097
  • Nurse-Midwives – $119,882
  • Nurse Educators – $114,609

Salaries for DNP Nurses in Connecticut’s Labor Market Areas

The Connecticut Department of Labor provides salary information for DNP-educated advanced nursing professionals in the state’s most populated labor markets (2015):

Nurse Administrators and Executives:

  • Bridgeport-Stamford – $187,199*
  • Danbury – $158,210
  • Hartford – $187,199*
  • New Haven – $183,011
  • Norwich-New London – $151,629
  • Waterbury – $187,199*

Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners:

  • Bridgeport-Stamford – $165,105
  • Hartford – $187,199*
  • New Haven – $121,007

Nurse Practitioners:

  • Bridgeport-Stamford – $131,390
  • Danbury – $116,748
  • Hartford – $124,627
  • New Haven – $129,139
  • Norwich-New London – $123,795
  • Waterbury – $121,544

Nurse-Midwives:

  • Hartford – $115,937
  • New Haven – $122,183

Nurse Educators:

  • Bridgeport-Stamford – $114,842
  • Hartford – $108,628
  • New Haven – $118,969

An Overview of Salaries for Connecticut’s DNP-Educated Nurses as Published by the US Department of Labor

The US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics provides an overview of the annual and hourly salaries for Connecticut’s nurses earning within the 75th and 90th percentiles to best represent earnings for DNP nurses (2014):

 

Occupation
Hourly 75th percentile wage
Annual 75th percentile wage

Medical and Health Services Managers

62.84
130710
Nursing Instructors and Teachers Postsecondary
Not available
92870
Nurse Anesthetists
90.00*
187199*
Nurse Midwives
53.52
111330
Nurse Practitioners
54.19
112720
Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners All Other
56.14
116780

*These values are equal to or greater than $90 an hour and $187,199 per year. The US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics does not report salary data higher than these values.

This page includes salaries that fall within the 75th and 90th percentiles for each nursing role to account for the fact that DNP-educated nurses are recognized as earning more than master’s-prepared nurses in the same roles.

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